Affiliated with Université Laval & CERVO Research Centre

Striatal Neurons Expressing D and D Receptors are Morphologically Distinct and Differently Affected by Dopamine Denervation in Mice.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Sci Rep, Volume 7, p.41432 (2017)

Keywords:

Animals, Dendritic Spines, Denervation, Dopamine, Dynorphins, Enkephalins, Mice, Transgenic, Neostriatum, Neurons, Nucleus Accumbens, Oxidopamine, Receptors, Dopamine D1, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Substantia Nigra, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase, Ventral Tegmental Area

Abstract:

<p>The loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease induces a reduction in the number of dendritic spines on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum expressing D or D dopamine receptor. Consequences on MSNs expressing both receptors (D/D MSNs) are currently unknown. We looked for changes induced by dopamine denervation in the density, regional distribution and morphological features of D/D MSNs, by comparing 6-OHDA-lesioned double BAC transgenic mice (Drd1a-tdTomato/Drd2-EGFP) to sham-lesioned animals. D/D MSNs are uniformly distributed throughout the dorsal striatum (1.9% of MSNs). In contrast, they are heterogeneously distributed and more numerous in the ventral striatum (14.6% in the shell and 7.3% in the core). Compared to D and D MSNs, D/D MSNs are endowed with a smaller cell body and a less profusely arborized dendritic tree with less dendritic spines. The dendritic spine density of D/D MSNs, but also of D and D MSNs, is significantly reduced in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. In contrast to D and D MSNs, the extent of dendritic arborization of D/D MSNs appears unaltered in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. Our data indicate that D/D MSNs in the mouse striatum form a distinct neuronal population that is affected differently by dopamine deafferentation that characterizes Parkinson's disease.</p>